Author Topic: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!  (Read 43539 times)

Snarky

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #360 on: 28 Nov 2010, 19:45 »
Yes, it sounds awkward, and moreover, I think a sentence of that form 90% of the time would mean "Not all of them got the lecture." In other words, some of them may have, but at least some people didn't.

Stupot

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #361 on: 28 Nov 2010, 22:30 »
This is more of an observation than a question, but feel free to discuss.
I've noticed how where British speakers of English say something like:

'you can't just come waltzing in here without knocking'

an American would say:

'you just can't come waltzing in here without knocking'... which to my British ears makes little sense.

Scarab

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #362 on: 29 Nov 2010, 15:41 »
Here's an example:
Say Person A is talented. Person B though thinks otherwise.
In German we say "Person B thinks Person A is not talented."
However, in English the usual way of expressing the same thing seems to be "Person B does not think Person A is talented."

I think the reason "B thinks A is not talented." is jarring in English is because it is more correct to use the prefix 'un-', or use an antonym instead.

"B thinks A is untalented" is far more natural to say, so to use the word 'not' to negate the word it makes more sense to refer to the verb.

For an antonym, consider "I don't think this is a good idea", "I think this isn't a good idea," and "I think this is a bad idea."

In the second example sentence, "isn't good" is more naturally replaced by "is bad".

Just my thoughts on the matter.

Is it more common in German to use 'not' rather than an antonym?

cat

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #363 on: 29 Nov 2010, 15:54 »
Is it more common in German to use 'not' rather than an antonym?

Yes, some antonyms also have a slightly different meaning than just using 'not'.

Calin Leafshade

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #364 on: 29 Nov 2010, 18:09 »
thats true in english to.

Just because something is *not* the case doesn't mean the opposite *is* the case.

LRH

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #365 on: 30 Nov 2010, 01:12 »
This is more of an observation than a question, but feel free to discuss.
I've noticed how where British speakers of English say something like:

'you can't just come waltzing in here without knocking'

an American would say:

'you just can't come waltzing in here without knocking'... which to my British ears makes little sense.

Actually, I'm an American and the second one sounds a bit off to me as well.

Ryan Timothy B

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #366 on: 30 Nov 2010, 05:11 »
I'm Canadian and the second one definitely sounds a bit off, but I wouldn't think twice about it if I heard it used.

Atelier

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #367 on: 20 Mar 2015, 10:57 »
*thunder clap* The thread... it's aliiive!


Important question -

Is century capitalised? 21st Century or 21st century?

Andail

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #368 on: 20 Mar 2015, 11:00 »
*thunder clap* The thread... it's aliiive!


Important question -

Is century capitalised? 21st Century or 21st century?

Unless "Century" is a name of your boat, and you've owned 20 before, you spell it century, lower case c.

Atelier

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #369 on: 20 Mar 2015, 12:43 »
Thanks :) I've been writing it wrong my whole life then, and only just now thought to question it.

Mandle

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #370 on: 20 Mar 2015, 17:43 »
I do a lot of proofreading for AGS games so I just thought I would put a simple bit of grammar down in here that I often find many people don't get (myself included until recently):

"any more" vs "anymore"

Here's the easy way to remember which to use:

"I don't want to take any more crap from that guy anymore."

"any more" indicates an amount of something.

"anymore" indicates time.

Okay, I'm not going to post any more usless crap in here anymore...

monkey0506

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #371 on: 21 Mar 2015, 00:13 »
Unless "Century" is a name of your boat, and you've owned 20 before, you spell it century, lower case c.





20th Century Fox

Only because you gave such a specific example about boats... :P Obviously, any time (not just pertaining to boats) it's being used as part of a name (and isn't being stylized for aesthetic purposes), then the first letter should be capitalized.

As an additional note (an an unabashed attempt to have something actually relevant to post), even in its anglicized form ("century"), the Roman "centuria" is not capitalized either.

And I've also just realized that "anglicized" isn't capitalized (unlike "Anglican"). (roll) The more you know...

Eric

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #372 on: 21 Mar 2015, 03:59 »
I'm fairly certain the Associated Press used to capitalize Century, which is perhaps where you got that from. They don't anymore, though.

One thing that bothers me, since "anymore" was brought up, is the positive use of the word, i.e. "anymore" used as a replacement for "nowadays." Anymore people use "anymore" to begin sentences, like this one, and it bugs the living shit out of me. I wish they wouldn't do that anymore.

Stupot

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #373 on: 21 Mar 2015, 05:02 »
Can't say I've ever come across 'anymore' as a replacement of 'nowadays' not at the beginning of a sentence. That just sounds way off to me.

Fitz

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #374 on: 21 Mar 2015, 07:28 »
Yeah, some people just take there langugage for granted. Their making all these errors with such constistency that they're is no telling what the proper way to spell is, nowadays.

I mean, anymore.

Or do I?

Eric

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #375 on: 21 Mar 2015, 18:26 »
Can't say I've ever come across 'anymore' as a replacement of 'nowadays' not at the beginning of a sentence. That just sounds way off to me.

It's apparently a regional affectation, and I've just moved in recent years to the region that's affected.

Cassiebsg

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #376 on: 21 Mar 2015, 19:12 »
I'm not English native, but that just rubs me the wrong way... 8-0
There are those who believe that life here began out there...

Mandle

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #377 on: 21 Mar 2015, 23:09 »
Yeah, some people just take there langugage for granted. Their making all these errors with such constistency that they're is no telling what the proper way to spell is, nowadays.

ROFL!!! And GAWD!!! It drives me CRAZY when people make those mistakes for real. And the best part is: it's ALWAYS native English speakers that make this mistake! Non-native English speakers always get their/there/they're correct. I mean come on! It's embarrassing!

Stupot

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #378 on: 22 Mar 2015, 00:24 »
Can't say I've ever come across 'anymore' as a replacement of 'nowadays' not at the beginning of a sentence. That just sounds way off to me.

It's apparently a regional affectation, and I've just moved in recent years to the region that's affected.
Of the five examples given on that page, the middle one does sound kind of acceptable, but still slightly off. The other four just sound weird to me.

Interestingly, Fitz's example shows is how it might have come to be used as a synonym of 'nowadays' because it seems to be acceptable at the end of the word and in a negative sentence. So, I can kind of understand how some groups of people may have developed the positive usage.  But not where I'm from.

MiteWiseacreLives!

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Re: English 101 with Trihan sometimes!
« Reply #379 on: 22 Mar 2015, 06:33 »
Yeah, some people just take there langugage for granted. Their making all these errors with such constistency that they're is no telling what the proper way to spell is, nowadays.

ROFL!!! And GAWD!!! It drives me CRAZY when people make those mistakes for real. And the best part is: it's ALWAYS native English speakers that make this mistake! Non-native English speakers always get their/there/they're correct. I mean come on! It's embarrassing!
Damn it, Mandle, take it easy on me!  Sometimes we get so caught up in trying to type our thoughts before we lose them we make dozens of simple grammar mistakes...   :-[
BTW
I miss two spaces after the end of a sentence.  Was that just a typewriter thing?